Filipino Wedding Traditions

Ang Pamamanhikan: Climbing for Love

If in the hustle and bustle of the city, the concepts of harana (serenade), a mahinhin (shy) Filipina woman, and a long panliligaw (courtship) are things of the past, it is reassuring to know that city-savvy people still believe in the age old custom of pamamanhikan.

From the word panik (which means to ascend or to climb a house’s flight of stairs), pamamanhikan is "the asking for the girl’s parents’ permission to wed the affianced pair." The custom symbolizes honor and respect for the parents, seeking their blessing and approval before getting married. >> read the full wedding article

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Wedding Day Festivities and Ceremonies

The wedding day is a time of great rejoicing. Its celebration is not an individual concern but affects the whole barrio. Even before the banns are proclaimed in the parish church, the highlights of conversation are focused on it. Excitement and anticipation pervade the atmosphere.

The kinsmen of the groom pool all their resources to prepare for the momentous event - to provide the bridal gown, decorate the church and the bride’s house, attend to the many guests that come, make ready for the marriage feast, and arrange all other pertinent details. >> read the full wedding article

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